This Guy Ate An Avocado…And You Won’t Believe What Happened Next!

Some time in the last century a friend of mine offered me some of her avocado.

No, thanks, I said. I don’t really like them.

Her eyes grew wide. How can that be? she asked. They’re so good.

I don’t get why people make such a big deal about them, I said. They’re bland. They don’t taste like anything. There’s nothing special about them.

But how can you not love that light, creamy, green taste? she pressed. It’s so rich and delicate at the same time.

She handed me the avocado and a spoon. Go ahead, she said. Try it again.

I didn’t hate avocados. They didn’t disgust me. And she seemed really sincere. So I thought, What the hell? And tried it.

And the windows were opened and the light came in.

Sun in clouds framed

Of course there was a light rich, creamy flavor somehow deep and delicate at the same time. But it wasn’t new. It had always been there.

It was the taste of an avocado – and I had tasted it before. I’d always known it. But I’d been looking for something else, something more obvious. Maybe something sweet or sour or salty, something intense.The avocado was none of these things, but it was extraordinary as it was. I just had to see that, and take it as it was. There was nothing extra needed – it was there all along.

It makes some people nuts when you say they’re perfect as they are. They feel pretty shitty a lot of the time, and they’re 20 pounds overweight, or they can’t stop smoking, or they’ll never finish that novel, or whatever the fuck it is. They can’t get their shit together. So when you tell them they’re perfect it seems idiotic, it sounds like bullshit.

Because they aren’t what they want to be, or what they hoped they would be, and time is running out!
 
And there’s no getting around it: life is a litany of disappointments. You lose everything you love, and you die at the end.

 True story.

Dream seat framed


And Death is so scary! It’s awful. Death is Darth Vader. Death destroys worlds. Everything frightening is frightening because it threatens us with death, even when we don’t see it that way. Even if we say we’re afraid of losing our job, or losing our wife, or losing our minds, it’s all death. It’s the loss of ourselves.

Because everything threatens us. Life is a stranger’s sojourn, and we’re never at rest. To be alive is to be uncomfortable, and to be imperilled. When we’re lonely we long for love, and if we find love we’re afraid to lose it. And often we do lose it, despite our best efforts or, worse, as a result of our best efforts, because our best efforts were not what the beloved wanted.

And other people are always happier than we are, or better looking, or they have more money.

So, you know, when you tell some people they’re perfect the way they are, they just think you’re mocking them, or that you’re full of shit.


But, regardless, each of us is perfect and pristine, an unfolding miracle, exactly as we are.

The problem is that our consciousness, the faculty that makes us so successful, that thrust us into unfettered dominion over the beasts of the earth and the fish of the sea, and endowed us with the vision and the tools to create the Alphabet, the Electric Light, and Two and a Half Men, has brought with it this illusion of a Self that is separate from the rest of the universe, that travels through it and is threatened by it.

And because this Self is so small compared to all that is, because deep inside we know that we die at the end, we have to spend our short lives propping up and defending this illusory ghost. William Mortensen - Creature

But it never ends. It’s never good enough. It can never be good enough. And we see everything from the inside, from the ghost’s point of view, from the grave.

And the world doesn’t care, and it doesn’t help us. It doesn’t take us seriously. It keeps throwing shit at us, and taking our stuff away. We can’t keep anything, and nothing works for long. To protect ourselves we have to fix everything. If we can just organize our shit we’ll be okay.

Because we’re never satisfied, the world is wrong. We need to fix it, to fix it, to fix it.


Take a second, right now. Just stop, and take a breath, and feel the breath within your body. Cool through your nostrils and throat, gently swelling through your torso, warm and full in your belly.


You will have felt some part of that. Even if you are racked by suffering and sorrow, there is some part within you that is at peace.

How can you reach it?

You can breathe again, and watch the breath, and feel it spread through your body.

You can rest for a  moment, for the span of a breath, just a few seconds. Feel the tingling in your toes or the top of your head, feel the warm luxuriant suchness of your torso, your belly, your chest. It’s just there – it just is. Feel how you are. Don’t back away.

You can let the pain go – there will be time for it later.

Don’t neglect the simple pleasure of being, the simple peace of being. Don’t neglect the miraculous fact that you are here, and that the time is now.

Do you see? It’s right here in front of you. Everything you’re looking for.

 

Look closer…

 

Do you see?

 

This guest contribution was by Chris Logan.  Chris is a long-time Dharma practitioner who writes about culture, ethics, and wisdom in Victoria, British Columbia.
His favorite color is blue.
His favorite berry is black.
Read more of his works at www.chrislogan.ca

If you enjoyed this, please sign up to our newsletter.  As a bonus, you’ll get our free ebook, The Dharma on Accomplishing Anything, to help you in your path to excellence!

 

 

Learning to Accept Injury

Image from https://www.flickr.com/photos/hotnacho/1369952540/

Last year, (November 11th 2014, to be exact) while bending over to pet my cat, I felt a sudden “oh sh%#” moment, as my L5 disc bulged, my right SI joint locked up, and my right psoas muscle pulled and seized in a moment of dimension shifting pain.  If my friend Dan wasn’t in the room, I would have cried.

Funny moment in retrospect: frozen in stationary position in my hallway, bent at the waist, petting my cat as he purred and stared at me.  I stood there for a few seconds, contemplating how to take the next step.  This moment left me immediately unable to walk, stand straight, or sit down without being in deep pain.  Now, this pain, and the resulting injury is nothing in comparison to others I have had which left me disabled for both months and years… but it was enough to remind me of the following important lessons: Continue reading

Looking back as we look forward

MontyFace

Twice and thrice over, as they say, good is it to repeat and review what is good. – Plato

 

The new year has come and gone.  Some of us have begun implementing our “New Year Resolutions”, of which only a few percentage of use will ever stay on track (see our last post on this here).  Others have no time whatsoever for these types of thoughts, and we have carried on with day to day lives, the only major change of which is to sign “2015” in the year part of the date.

For us, looking back, this little website and our book (the book, mostly!) have come a long way from an idea in 2011.

We thought we’d have a short post for all our readers, new and old, to highlight some of the ideas, strategies and systems that have made a big impact in our lives.  Following are a few of our favourite, and most popular, posts from over the years.

Sometimes, we over complicate what a meditation should be.  The Square Breath meditation, though effective in its result, only takes 16 seconds to tune into.  Check out this little gem : Continue reading

Ayahuasca and Moulding Thoughts

wordBallFinal

We have the pleasure of presenting a guest post from a friend who wishes to remain anonymous at this time.  We at Dharma in Every Wave are open to many point of view, and believe that insight can be attained from any number of sources.  Prayer, meditation, comic books, nature, even psychedelics.  Please enjoy the following read!

My first experience with Ayahuasca began humbly enough, yet taught me a significant lesson which I carry within myself to this day.

A phone call from a friend in a distant, wintered city started my journey.  My friend, we’ll call him Sean for the purpose of protecting his identity, told me about the revelatory and healing experience he had from the result of drinking the bitter tasting tea from the Amazon.  An experience so profound that he saw the roots of his life-long emotional anguish, and was able to begin bringing to surface the potential for forgiveness, peace, and a happy life.  This situation was not to be taken lightly,  as Sean had never really used drugs, let alone psychedelics.  I listened in awe and intensity as he describe his journey, and excitedly accepted his offer to refer me to the group for the next ceremony, which was less than a month away.

Sean then proceeded to explain more about the ceremony, the time leading up to it, the diet that must be undertaken in order to cleanse your body of toxins as best as possible, and the importance of setting an intention.  The intention can be summed up as this: What is it you want to explore within yourself? 

We said our goodbyes, and my journey began. Continue reading

Chapter 1 sample of our upcoming book

Beach-Ocean-Wave

Well friends, we’ve been working feverishly and furiously on the book.  Following is a sample of the first chapter, for your reading enjoyment.  We’ve included clips of a few of the sections.

We hope you enjoy it, and share it too!
 

Chapter 1 – Finding the Path
Sojourn, pt. 1

It’s raining cold, dark sheets on the windy road to the coastal surf town. I left as early as possible to get to the beach for sunrise. It’s 8 AM, but the sky is still dark with grey clouds and torrents of water. I pull up to Long beach to see if I want to get in the water before heading into town and warming myself up with one of the greatest gifts from the earth: a freshly brewed coffee.

The scene is a familiar one on the west coast of Canada: mountains of deep blue water crashing onto sandy and rocky beaches. Driftwood logs from the logging industry litter the coastline. Rain comes from all directions. Strong winds spray the tops off of the distant waves and help them keep from breaking. All in all, this morning is perfectly frightening.

The sound is violently calming. The universe moves these waves at its whim, pushing them against the sand and stone beaches of this once remote part of the world. I roll down my truck window to smell the air.  Salt floods my nostrils and refreshes my soul as the ions enter and play with my senses, pulling memories of past times in the ocean to the forefront of my mind. Continue reading

How I stopped incorporating Dharma, and left my dreams behind.

Dawn dust grass

 

This post is a little different. It’s more of a rant, an honest expression on how I thought I failed, and what I have created to bring myself back from that mindset. I hope this contributes some value to you, and that you can use the system for your own benefit.

There was a time, months ago, where I was fervently moving towards everything I wanted in life. I was dating a beautiful, intelligent, and motivated woman, with the thought that I would one day have a family to nest with.

I was always pushing my career further, moving into new areas in which I had no experience, but wanted to take on and grow into.

I exercised daily, and pushed my martial arts skills to new levels, motivated by the satisfaction of better, faster, and stronger movements.

I wrote for this blog almost daily, with notebooks and post it notes full of ideas to be one day incorporated as insightful posts and chapters for our upcoming book, Dharma in Every Wave.

I read books on leadership and communication, using the lessons, tips, strategies and systems in my career, personal relationships, and day-to-day interactions with strangers.

I meditated daily, a half hour in the morning on waking, and a half hour before bed. This brought peace and ease to my life in immeasurable ways.

Then one day, in March of 2014, I suddenly lost all my motivation for most things I was working towards. I lost my vision of what I wanted my life to look like. Things were automatic and built in, but I did not remember why I was doing all these things.

I forgot the essence of my life, and what was important to me.

Continue reading

Courtesy to an ant – a meditation on connection

The elephant becomes courteous to the ant

A few days ago, during my spring solstice meditation (Every Solstice, a friend and I tend to dedicate an entire evening, usually into the wee hours of the morning, to focused meditation), I stopped for a few minutes to read some Hafiz. In case you do not know Hafiz, he was a Persian poet, not unlike Rumi in his greatness. Though a few of his poems stroke me particularly deeply that evening, this one resonated to my core, and has been with me since.

God
Blooms
On the Shoulder
Of the
Elephant
Who Becomes
Courteous
To
The
Ant.

Wow, it still hits me strongly. No matter what your version of God is (in my case, it is a form of universal connection between all things), the depth of these words are profound. The patience, love, and respect we can all develop, by respecting all beings, is simply awe inspiring. Imagine if the next time you were out in the world, you were as equally generous with kindness to strangers as with your friends and family?

The poem, and this vision of kindness, reminds me of the story of the Buddha and an untouchable named Sunita. In ancient India, the untouchables were the lowest caste in the Hindu caste system. They were the wretched, the poor, the diseased. They cleaned toilets, did the hardest work, and were prohibited from entering Hindu temples. If they were heard reciting prayers, their tongues were cut out. It was the worst imaginable existence. But the Buddha did not care.

In the story of Sunita the untouchable, the Buddha approached him, and said “My friend, please come closer so that we may talk”. Continue reading

The Suffering of lies

When is a cat a dog?

“Rahula, for anyone who has no shame at intentional lying, there is no evil that that person cannot do.” – The Buddha to his son, on lying.

This week, I am going to touch on something that has hit close to home recently.  Sadly, I discovered that a close and dear friend of mine had been lying to myself, and others, about both unimportant and important things.  I was angry and reactive at first, thinking about the wrong that had been done to me.  Over the course of a few days, I let go of the attachment of being wronged, and began reading up on lying, trying to gain and understanding of where it comes from.  I re-read portions of the 5 precepts in Buddhism, but also the reasons of why we lie and the effects on us. The major discovery I unearthed is that lying is usually born out of shame, and essentially, a twisted method to trying to be happy.

Let me start at the end of my research, as understanding the causes of lying can lead to more compassionate understanding of others, ourselves, and the purpose of the fourth precept which is “to not lie, to be truthful”. Continue reading