The Buddha Walks into the Office

For this post, we’ve come up with… a book review!  Looking forward, we will be making this a regular staple of our posts here at Dharma in Every Wave.  Sometimes, we forget to put posts up… but we are always reading and taking notes.  If you like the idea, and have books you can recommend, please comment below and share!

Kid, you had a rough day.  Everyone has them.  And when you do – do what I do – you ask yourself: Anybody’s life better because of what I did today?  If the answer’s yes… then stop your whining.  If not, well, do better tomorrow.

- Comic book character Nick Fury.

If there is one thing that I remember after turning the last page of Lodro Rinzler’s The Buddha Walks into the Office, it would be built on the above quote based entirely on the words of a fictional character.  Not only did it make me laugh and recall Samuel L. Jackson’s rendition in the recent Avengers movie, but it also held a deep message that I could serve to refer to daily.  Indeed, if there is one thing we could all do, it is to try and make other people’s lives better.

This teaching of working for the benefit of others, directly and indirectly, is one of the core themes often revisited this poignant and often inspiring. The book itself is about applying the underlying Buddhist roots and teachings to a modern scenario we are mostly all subject to.  A place where our emotions often get the best of us.  Where our encounters with others can be a forced mix of personalities who are not necessarily the people we would spend time with in social situations.  That place, would be where we go to work.

Lodro writes that you should be “…approaching your life and work from the perspective of what is good for everyone, not just yourself.”

“When someone comes to you with an issue, they often believe it is the most important thing on your agenda as well as theirs.  To treat it as otherwise is a slap in the face.  To lean in and meet that person in that state of mind where they can sense that you value what they are working on is a gift.  When you create this kind of space for someone, they will often resolve a difficult issue in an amicable way, because you offered them your heart.”

“When we engage our speech in a kind and mindful manner, we are not just avoiding causing harm to others.  We are treating every encounter with our coworkers as a spiritual practice, an opportunity to connect with our goodness and theirs.”

Building on this way of seeing and helping others, Lodro tells us that the real goal, the real juice of meditation, is to bring the lessons of those quiet hours of contemplation to fruition in the real world in trying situations.

“If you can shift your view so that your work is spirituality, then you can bring your meditation practice off the cushion and live your hours at work with meaning and purpose.”

Lodro does not lose sight of what many of us want in life: to be, or to follow, a great leader.  Vulnerability is explored as one of the most desirable strengths a leader could possess. 

“It is said that people are more likely to follow a leader if that individual is easy to relate to in some way.  We are inspired by leaders who make themselves available.  In his book Integrity, Dr. Henry Cloud wrote, “The tension between vulnerability and strength in leaders cannot be lost.”  This is the power of bodhicitta.  It is not a weepy heart or a heart that whines a lot.  It has tremendous strength because it is a heart that is open, capable, and brave.”

“When faced with cynicism or overt threats, a strong leader will rise to the occasion with a sense of openness.  I am a firm believer that cynicism can be overcome by power of an awake heart and that uncomfortable conversations can be softened through bodhicitta.”

(Bodhicitta is a Sanskrit term.  Bodhi for “open” and citta for “heart”.)

The Six Paramitas

Building on and exploring vulnerability, Lodro works through six states of being that can help each us be more mindful at work, and bring an ease to the areas we are involved in.  In Sanskrit, these states are known as the six Paramitas.  Para can be translated from Sanskrit as “other shore” and mita as “arrived”.

1. dana (generosity)

“Pema Chodron once said on the topic of generosity, “The main point isn’t so much that we give, but that we unlock our habit of clinging.”  Whether you are giving your material possessions, money, time, service, or presence, it is about offering yourself in a way that unbinds you from your habitual way of relating to the world.”

2. shila (discipline)

“Discipline often gets a bad rap.  People think it’s something that is going to be imposed on them, like when you mess up at work and your boss calls you in to his office to discipline you.  The Buddhist perspective is much different from that and is based on developing virtue.”

“…to practice discipline is to carry out more positive actions.  The more you meditate, the more you turn the tide against the habitual way you have lived your life.  One easy way to do this is to determine what “positive actions” means to you.”

“My personal recommendation is to jot down then positive actions that you can do at work on any given day.”

When performing positive actions for others, it’s good to remember that “…the biggest jerks we know are the ones most in need of kindness and care.  So please apply the discipline of working to better their lives, too.”

“It’s always easy to be nice to those who are nice to us.  The real challenge, and the situation that can effect the most change in the workplace, and the world, is to be helpful to those difficult people who annoy the hell out of you.”

3. kshanti (patience)

“Dudjom Rinpoche has said, “The point of patience is to train so that our altruistic attitude is immovable and irrepressible in the face of those who hurt us with their ingratitude and so forth.”  Patience is not something that is based in just waiting until you get to do what you want to do, with those people you want to do things with.  It is based in relating fully with a situation, even if it annoys the hell out of you.”

 “Patience is easy to practice when you know something is going to happen eventually; it is an asset when you don’t know what will happen next.  If you can smile in the face of uncertainty, you are well trained.”

4. virya (exertion)

Exertion “encompasses both applying yourself on behalf of others and rousing yourself to think about more than just your own particular situation.”

“One thing you can do to try …this type of exertion is to take a “choose me” approach. Anytime your boss asks for volunteers for an upcoming task, be the first one to throw your hand up in the air.  Exert yourself beyond your comfort level.  Try this for up to one week and see how you feel at the end of it.”

“We can embrace the path of offering ourselves for others as a means to our own happiness.”

5. samadhi (meditative concentration

 “The simple fact is that when we are focused and truly mindful, we feel good about what we are doing, whether it is eating a good meal, enjoying a conversation with a client, or completing a successful surgery.”

“The internet has made it so that completing a simple report can take ten times longer than it should because your friends want to g-chat with you, your ex has posted pictures of himself/herself on Facebook, and the latest gossip site has just broken a big story.”

“It may be best to cut down on multitasking and develop a feeling of well-being by bringing yourself entirely to whatever is right in front of you.”

“If you are truly present with people, they begin to feel respected and encouraged.”

6. prajna (wisdom)

 “There is great wisdom in taking the time to hear someone out and give yourself the space to understand what they are trying to communicate.  When you sit down to meet with someone, you can take the attitude of not needing to come up with an immediate solution to whatever the issue is.  You can avoid interrupting them or making assumptions and instead listen deeply.”

 “After deeply listening to a variety of opinions, you should chew on them.  See what truth sits with you and what does not.  Reflect on what has been offered to you.  There is an element of patience in this process as you continue to contemplate what you have heard, sorting through what comments ring true and which you think ought to be disregarded.”

“Sakyong Mipham Rinpoche wrote, “When our attitude is open, we can have fun with what the world presents.”  The workplace does not have to be a battleground; that is just one way to view it.  Instead we can view it as a fun factory.  You can begin by offering the paramitas to yourself, seeing how they influence your behaviour.  See if they perk you up, if you feel uplifted and joyful because of them.  See if you become more efficient at work.  Then you can begin offering the paramitas to others, both the individuals you like and those you have a hard time with.  Eventually, you can offer this perfect activity to everyone you meet.  If you are able to offer your heart in this way, it can transform not just your workplace but the entire world.”

The Six Ways of Ruling

There is another set of teachings from the Tibetan Buddhist canon whose purpose is to guide a person in their position of leadership.  These teachings, if adhered to, can help ensure that you stay a warm, open and genuine leader who inspires those around you.

1. Benevolence

“The Oxford English Dictionary defines benevolent as “well-meaning and kindly.”  In the context of the Six Ways of Ruling, however, benevolence means more than just meaning well; it is actively engaging kindness so that the lives of the people you are leading are changed for the better.

For example, benevolence might mean that you are open enough to recognize that keeping employees late ruins last-minute dinner plans with their spouse or makes them less likely to get enough sleep to be competent the next day.  Seeing their situation and feeling empathy will lead you to decide what is best for both the project at hand and the employees.  You are taking a holistic look at your work situation rather than focusing on deadlines alone.”

 “When you have a conviction in basic goodness, you develop a sense of weightiness, like the sheriff.  He knows that he is doing what is right, what needs to be done, so he is stable and solid, like a mountain.  Being true to your own goodness has that kind of power.  You can be as steadfast as a mountain when you experience the strength of your basic goodness.”

2. Truth

“The first aspect of being true is unwavering presence, that mountain-like steadiness.  Then there is the second aspect: power.  There is tremendous power within that steadiness, that Olympian ability to truly be there for a task or for others.The last element… is warmth.  “

3. Genuineness

“Durant, summarizing Aristotle again, said, “Excellence then, is not an act, but a habit.”  Excellence in the workplace is not a onetime thing.  Neither is being genuine. In both cases, you have to repeatedly come back to the idea that you want to be genuine with others.  If you can hold that as a mantra worth repeating, then you can spend your day coming back to this simple principle over and over again, gradually undoing negative habitual patterns and replacing them with the Six Ways of Ruling.”

4. Fearlessness

“One aspect of working from a position of power is learning when you need to be fearless.  Fearlessness is the fourth of the Six Ways of Ruling, and the first of the three under the heading of powerful.”

“Fearlessness is based in the idea that in order to truly deal with your phobias, you need to confront them with an open heart and mind.  Eventually, through repetition, meditation, and possibly even therapy, you can work through them.”

5. Artfulness

“Artfulness is the fifth of the Six Ways of Ruling.  It is the ability to flow with your life, as opposed to measuring it out in exact terms.  It is seeing what needs to happen and making it happen, utilizing the skill sets at your disposal.  When you are successful at being artful, everything looks effortless.”

“This aspect of artfulness is sometimes referred to as arranging your kingdom.  Imagine your life as a kingdom, with you as the monarch.  Knowing you cannot do everything or be everywhere, you need to appoint certain people as ministers, others as generals, others as educators, and so on, so that everyone has their rightful place in the kingdom based on their unique abilities.

“Being artful includes consideration of others.  The artful leader cares about the people they are leading and wants to know them intimately.”

6. Rejoicing

“The final quality of the Six Ways of Ruling is rejoicing.  While is sounds simple enough, many of us don’t take the time to celebrate our lives as fully as we should.  We have a knack for dwelling on all the upsets that come our way, complaining about our inconveniences, instead of celebrating everything that we have going for us.”

“It’s actually possible to celebrate whatever or not we have something specific to celebrate.  With the view that everyone and everything we encounter is rooted in basic goodness, we can find magic in any situation.”

“Rejoicing is a direct outcome of combining the previous five methods of leadership.  When you are benevolent to others, are true to yoUr own goodness, can genuinely point out the logic in any given situation, are fearless in presenting that goodness and logic, and are artful in your execution, a great deal can be accomplished.  When that happens, it’s only natural to party.”

There is a quick reminder of our daily challenges: “If we recognize obstacles as merely part of the display of our world, then we realize we don’t have to take them – or ourselves – so seriously.  You are not this heavy, solid thing but a vast conglomeration of knowledge and experience that is ever-changing.  Similarly, when you face an obstacle, you should think of it in the same impermanent, fluid way.”

The book ends with an important reminder of how we can choose to be in the world.  A mantra which, combined with some moment of silence first thing in the morning,can help create a day of ease, no matter the adversity.

Let go of what has passed.
Let go of what may come.
Let go of what is happening now.
Don’t try to figure anything out.
Don’t try to make anything happen.
Relax, right now, and rest.

If you enjoyed this, please sign up to our newsletter.  As a bonus, you’ll get our free ebook, The Dharma on Accomplishing Anything, to help you in your path to excellence!

This Guy Ate An Avocado…And You Won’t Believe What Happened Next!

Some time in the last century a friend of mine offered me some of her avocado.

No, thanks, I said. I don’t really like them.

Her eyes grew wide. How can that be? she asked. They’re so good.

I don’t get why people make such a big deal about them, I said. They’re bland. They don’t taste like anything. There’s nothing special about them.

But how can you not love that light, creamy, green taste? she pressed. It’s so rich and delicate at the same time.

She handed me the avocado and a spoon. Go ahead, she said. Try it again.

I didn’t hate avocados. They didn’t disgust me. And she seemed really sincere. So I thought, What the hell? And tried it.

And the windows were opened and the light came in.

Sun in clouds framed

Of course there was a light rich, creamy flavor somehow deep and delicate at the same time. But it wasn’t new. It had always been there.

It was the taste of an avocado – and I had tasted it before. I’d always known it. But I’d been looking for something else, something more obvious. Maybe something sweet or sour or salty, something intense.The avocado was none of these things, but it was extraordinary as it was. I just had to see that, and take it as it was. There was nothing extra needed – it was there all along.

It makes some people nuts when you say they’re perfect as they are. They feel pretty shitty a lot of the time, and they’re 20 pounds overweight, or they can’t stop smoking, or they’ll never finish that novel, or whatever the fuck it is. They can’t get their shit together. So when you tell them they’re perfect it seems idiotic, it sounds like bullshit.

Because they aren’t what they want to be, or what they hoped they would be, and time is running out!
 
And there’s no getting around it: life is a litany of disappointments. You lose everything you love, and you die at the end.

 True story.

Dream seat framed


And Death is so scary! It’s awful. Death is Darth Vader. Death destroys worlds. Everything frightening is frightening because it threatens us with death, even when we don’t see it that way. Even if we say we’re afraid of losing our job, or losing our wife, or losing our minds, it’s all death. It’s the loss of ourselves.

Because everything threatens us. Life is a stranger’s sojourn, and we’re never at rest. To be alive is to be uncomfortable, and to be imperilled. When we’re lonely we long for love, and if we find love we’re afraid to lose it. And often we do lose it, despite our best efforts or, worse, as a result of our best efforts, because our best efforts were not what the beloved wanted.

And other people are always happier than we are, or better looking, or they have more money.

So, you know, when you tell some people they’re perfect the way they are, they just think you’re mocking them, or that you’re full of shit.


But, regardless, each of us is perfect and pristine, an unfolding miracle, exactly as we are.

The problem is that our consciousness, the faculty that makes us so successful, that thrust us into unfettered dominion over the beasts of the earth and the fish of the sea, and endowed us with the vision and the tools to create the Alphabet, the Electric Light, and Two and a Half Men, has brought with it this illusion of a Self that is separate from the rest of the universe, that travels through it and is threatened by it.

And because this Self is so small compared to all that is, because deep inside we know that we die at the end, we have to spend our short lives propping up and defending this illusory ghost. William Mortensen - Creature

But it never ends. It’s never good enough. It can never be good enough. And we see everything from the inside, from the ghost’s point of view, from the grave.

And the world doesn’t care, and it doesn’t help us. It doesn’t take us seriously. It keeps throwing shit at us, and taking our stuff away. We can’t keep anything, and nothing works for long. To protect ourselves we have to fix everything. If we can just organize our shit we’ll be okay.

Because we’re never satisfied, the world is wrong. We need to fix it, to fix it, to fix it.


Take a second, right now. Just stop, and take a breath, and feel the breath within your body. Cool through your nostrils and throat, gently swelling through your torso, warm and full in your belly.


You will have felt some part of that. Even if you are racked by suffering and sorrow, there is some part within you that is at peace.

How can you reach it?

You can breathe again, and watch the breath, and feel it spread through your body.

You can rest for a  moment, for the span of a breath, just a few seconds. Feel the tingling in your toes or the top of your head, feel the warm luxuriant suchness of your torso, your belly, your chest. It’s just there – it just is. Feel how you are. Don’t back away.

You can let the pain go – there will be time for it later.

Don’t neglect the simple pleasure of being, the simple peace of being. Don’t neglect the miraculous fact that you are here, and that the time is now.

Do you see? It’s right here in front of you. Everything you’re looking for.

 

Look closer…

 

Do you see?

 

This guest contribution was by Chris Logan.  Chris is a long-time Dharma practitioner who writes about culture, ethics, and wisdom in Victoria, British Columbia.
His favorite color is blue.
His favorite berry is black.
Read more of his works at www.chrislogan.ca

If you enjoyed this, please sign up to our newsletter.  As a bonus, you’ll get our free ebook, The Dharma on Accomplishing Anything, to help you in your path to excellence!

 

 

Looking back as we look forward

MontyFace

Twice and thrice over, as they say, good is it to repeat and review what is good. – Plato

 

The new year has come and gone.  Some of us have begun implementing our “New Year Resolutions”, of which only a few percentage of use will ever stay on track (see our last post on this here).  Others have no time whatsoever for these types of thoughts, and we have carried on with day to day lives, the only major change of which is to sign “2015” in the year part of the date.

For us, looking back, this little website and our book (the book, mostly!) have come a long way from an idea in 2011.

We thought we’d have a short post for all our readers, new and old, to highlight some of the ideas, strategies and systems that have made a big impact in our lives.  Following are a few of our favourite, and most popular, posts from over the years.

Sometimes, we over complicate what a meditation should be.  The Square Breath meditation, though effective in its result, only takes 16 seconds to tune into.  Check out this little gem : Continue reading

Ayahuasca and Moulding Thoughts

wordBallFinal

We have the pleasure of presenting a guest post from a friend who wishes to remain anonymous at this time.  We at Dharma in Every Wave are open to many point of view, and believe that insight can be attained from any number of sources.  Prayer, meditation, comic books, nature, even psychedelics.  Please enjoy the following read!

My first experience with Ayahuasca began humbly enough, yet taught me a significant lesson which I carry within myself to this day.

A phone call from a friend in a distant, wintered city started my journey.  My friend, we’ll call him Sean for the purpose of protecting his identity, told me about the revelatory and healing experience he had from the result of drinking the bitter tasting tea from the Amazon.  An experience so profound that he saw the roots of his life-long emotional anguish, and was able to begin bringing to surface the potential for forgiveness, peace, and a happy life.  This situation was not to be taken lightly,  as Sean had never really used drugs, let alone psychedelics.  I listened in awe and intensity as he describe his journey, and excitedly accepted his offer to refer me to the group for the next ceremony, which was less than a month away.

Sean then proceeded to explain more about the ceremony, the time leading up to it, the diet that must be undertaken in order to cleanse your body of toxins as best as possible, and the importance of setting an intention.  The intention can be summed up as this: What is it you want to explore within yourself? 

We said our goodbyes, and my journey began. Continue reading

Chapter 1 sample of our upcoming book

Beach-Ocean-Wave

Well friends, we’ve been working feverishly and furiously on the book.  Following is a sample of the first chapter, for your reading enjoyment.  We’ve included clips of a few of the sections.

We hope you enjoy it, and share it too!
 

Chapter 1 – Finding the Path
Sojourn, pt. 1

It’s raining cold, dark sheets on the windy road to the coastal surf town. I left as early as possible to get to the beach for sunrise. It’s 8 AM, but the sky is still dark with grey clouds and torrents of water. I pull up to Long beach to see if I want to get in the water before heading into town and warming myself up with one of the greatest gifts from the earth: a freshly brewed coffee.

The scene is a familiar one on the west coast of Canada: mountains of deep blue water crashing onto sandy and rocky beaches. Driftwood logs from the logging industry litter the coastline. Rain comes from all directions. Strong winds spray the tops off of the distant waves and help them keep from breaking. All in all, this morning is perfectly frightening.

The sound is violently calming. The universe moves these waves at its whim, pushing them against the sand and stone beaches of this once remote part of the world. I roll down my truck window to smell the air.  Salt floods my nostrils and refreshes my soul as the ions enter and play with my senses, pulling memories of past times in the ocean to the forefront of my mind. Continue reading

The Suffering of lies

When is a cat a dog?

“Rahula, for anyone who has no shame at intentional lying, there is no evil that that person cannot do.” – The Buddha to his son, on lying.

This week, I am going to touch on something that has hit close to home recently.  Sadly, I discovered that a close and dear friend of mine had been lying to myself, and others, about both unimportant and important things.  I was angry and reactive at first, thinking about the wrong that had been done to me.  Over the course of a few days, I let go of the attachment of being wronged, and began reading up on lying, trying to gain and understanding of where it comes from.  I re-read portions of the 5 precepts in Buddhism, but also the reasons of why we lie and the effects on us. The major discovery I unearthed is that lying is usually born out of shame, and essentially, a twisted method to trying to be happy.

Let me start at the end of my research, as understanding the causes of lying can lead to more compassionate understanding of others, ourselves, and the purpose of the fourth precept which is “to not lie, to be truthful”. Continue reading

Let it go.

Let go

“Do not pray for an easy life, pray for the strength to endure a difficult one” – Bruce Lee

In our multifaceted, complex lives, sometimes things can be difficult.  We travel for work, spending long days away from home. Our bodies become sick. We argue with loved ones. We end up jobless at a time when money is needed most. We are judged by those that don’t understand the actions we take.

Someone close to us leaves us behind.

We then cry out that these things shouldn’t happen; they should not be the way they are.  We decide that things, life, and events are unjust and unfair.   We label them, judging them as bad or good, instead of accepting the ways things are: neither good, neither bad, just there.

The weather is never bad, it’s just weather.

In this way of resisting what is, we add lots of negativity, anxiety, and frustration. Often times, we spend more energy criticizing how terrible things are than what what is done in the first place! How many times have we recounted to friends and family about the terrible driver that cut us off that day? The unfair cost increase in our power bill? The store ran out of bananas?

This way of carrying things around with us, past the event itself, is well recounted in a story of two monks. Continue reading

6 Things to Help Create Calm and Focus

Too often in our lives today, we aren’t in tune with the environment around us; the air, the earth, the people, or even, ourselves.  We forget to take time and focus, remain calm.  We forget the important things in life: life itself.  We begin to live by other people’s rules and ideals.  We forget what makes US tick.  We end up with a wide variety of people, all in different levels of connection with the environment around them.

Some are like the familiar co-worker – Let’s call him John.  John is there every day when you arrive to work.  He’s been there since daybreak, skipped breakfast, is drinking coffee, and has a diet consisting of, on a good day, pizza, soft drinks, and cookies.   He often complains that there is not enough time in the day, he is scattered, unfocused, never giving his all to an item, and tends to stay later than everyone else.

Then, there others… the weird ones that seem to always have life under control, and exude a calmness around them we can’t quite figure out.

Let’s call the fella that embodies this Jeff.  Jeff values work, but not more than his health.  He realizes that in order to be effective at work, he needs to be healthy, both physically and emotionally.  He has always eaten a good breakfast after a calming night of sleep.  He is calm and collected, giving his full attention to any item or conversation he is involved with.  When necessary, he stays late at work, but does not make it an expected, regular occurrence.  He is supportive of others, and seems to always have a
thoughtful, alternative point of view.

Of course, these are 2 different sides, and there is everything in between.  Which one are you like?  Take a moment and think about this.  Seriously.  Do not read any further until you have thought about your day, your energy level, your ability to focus, and calmness under pressure.

Once you have thought about where you are, continue and take a look at some simple things that could create more calmness and focus in your day.

1. Drink a glass of water immediately after waking up.  You lose moisture while you sleep, so you’re less hydrated in the morning. It’s kind of like working an 8 hour shift without any drink! A glass of water helps to restore this balance within yourself, feels good, and starts your system up for the day.

2. Take a minute to be calm, assess yourself, and your day.  If you jump straight out of bed, and rush to get to work, there’s  very good chance you rush through many things without thinking or being mindful of where you are at or want to go.  Take a minute after your glass of water to sit there, look out the window, think about the day you have, and what you want to accomplish.  If it takes getting up 5 minutes earlier, do it.  Do not hit snooze on your alarm.  Do not force yourself into rushing.

3. Eat a healthy breakfast.  Breakfast sets the energy in your body for the day.  Skip it, and you will rely on coffee and quick snacks to keep going, only to crash in the afternoon.  Aim to have a high amount of proteins and some fruit for breakfast.  This will help minimize the carbohydrate sugar hit and crash that can happen.  Have a smoothie. Eat some eggs.  Black beans with salsa.  SKIP CEREAL.  Cereal is usually starch and high amounts of sugar, with little to no protein, and leaves you hungry shortly later.  For some more ideas and a breakfast I stick to that helps my energy levels, check out Tim Ferris’s blog about breakfasts here.

4. Schedule your work tasks as best as possible, and take breaks.  Upon arriving at work, go over the important tasks you need to accomplish today, and focus on getting them done!  Then work in 50 minute increments, making significant progress on tasks during those 50 minutes, then take 10 minutes to stretch, go to the washroom, drink some water, and go over the tasks for the rest of the day.  By setting what you want to accomplish in advance of the work, and giving yourself permission to have a few minutes break every hour, you allow your mind to stay calm, more focused, and , in turn, accomplish more.

5. Do one thing that makes you smile, every day.  This is key.  Every day, we give ourselves and our energy to work, people, and thoughts. By taking the time to do something you enjoy, you give yourself some energy back.  This could be exercise, writing, playing frisbee, calling friends, walking your dog, painting, carving, playing music. Anything that you truly enjoy and smile from!  Even if only for 5 minutes, take the time to allow yourself to play.

6. Meditate, and consider the day you had.  If you meditate, have a session before bed.  Allow your self to be calm, and bring your day to completion.  If you have never meditated, check out our simple Square Breath meditation here.  If you do not want to meditate, then just take a couple of minutes and think about the day you had, bringing it to a wrap.  Breathe for a minute, then pour yourself a glass of water for tomorrow morning.

Repeat daily.  Read this post first thing every morning to help you remember.